Adventures in Resale

IMG_2745When I was in high school I never felt that pull to conform to what other people were doing, wearing or listening to. I went to a rural area public school, and we basically all had the same background. For me that came later, my third year of college.

I started nursing school at a small private college, smack dab in the middle of a good sized city. Suddenly I felt like my rural, poverty line upbringing was something to be ashamed of, and I started shopping to fit in. To make a long story short, it ended badly. I specifically remember one day when I was handed back not one, but two maxed out credit cards. I’d like to say I stopped there but I didn’t. After the two maxed out cards, I opened a card I forgot about which ended up going to collections and I later settled.

My dysfunctional relationship with credit was short and I’m glad I stopped when I did. But it’s something I frequently think about and regret. I have a jewelry box full of costume jewelry, bins of shoes and clothes, all we’ve moved three times and have been storing, and none of which I wear. My own personal tell-tale heart, reminding me of the havoc I wrought upon my finances.

But I think I finally figured a remedy; resale.

I frequently consign the kid’s old clothes and toys for either cash or store credit. I wish selling adult clothing was that easy.  So this is a run-down of all the different ways I’ve used/ am using to try to sell some of the stuff I sunk myself on, and hopefully make some money back.

IMG_2717Children’s Orchard- My weakness is always buying things for the kids, and apparently this is the same for other people too. Every birthday and holiday (even minor ones) my kids get toys, heaps of gifts and new clothes. While we’re blessed to have so many people who love our kids, we need to be able to put clothes in drawers and toys in toy boxes.
Before we moved into this house, we lived pretty close to a kid’s consignment shop called the Children’s Orchard. I went in to shop one day soon after we resolved to cut back on spending (but kids still need clothes). The woman at the register said they were looking for toys and clothes to buy, so I made an appointment and brought a few things in. I dropped them off and a buyer went through everything and offered me a price for cash payout, and then 20% more if I took the payout as store credit. Of course I took store credit since the kids needed a few things.
IMG_2718So basically I shopped for free after trading in some old stuff, AND the drawers and closets were cleaned out!
Earlier this month I did my spring drawer clean out, and a basement cleanup of some toys the kids had gotten for Christmas that literally could not fit in the house. Most of them were new in boxes. The plan was to donate them to Toys for Tots, which is something we’ve been doing for years. I was going to bring in some clothes anyways so I though I’d try selling some toys too, and then what didn’t sell would be saved to donate this year. Well. They took everything and offered me over $80 in store credit!! Plus I found some adorable summer dresses for Abby, a pair of shoes for Sam and a playsuit for Ben. So from just bringing a couple of things to the consignment shop I got:

  1. Cleaned out and organized dressers,
  2. Closer to having the clean and organized basement that I’ve been dreaming about,
  3. Two dresses, Converse summer sneakers and a baby playsuit that costed nothing!

This is why I call it “shopping for free.” Always so much win.

Ebay- Judging by my Instagram feed, there are a lot of people who do extremely well reselling things on Ebay. I’m not one of those people. Ebay was the first platform I tried and I haven’t sold a single thing. Not only that, but I’m pretty sure I sent someone foot fetish porn. For free.
Back story- I listed two pairs of platform heels that I spent way too much money on and never wore. I was so excited when I got a message asking me to send “a few pictures with the shoes on” so the buyer can see them better. And I fell for it. Needless to say I didn’t sell the shoes. Nor did I sell them the second time when the original listing expired and I resisted them, only to be met with THE EXACT SAME MESSAGE. Nice try buddy.

I still haven’t sold either pair, if you’re interested.

Brick and Mortar Consignment Store- A flower shop in my town closed and all the women were very excited when an upscale consignment shop opened in it’s place. I brought a small box of shoes, handbags and accessories down, and they actually sold quite a bit of it. However, I still wouldn’t say this is my most successful method of selling things.
First of all, the shop takes a huge bite of what they sell the item for. Their cut is usually 40-60%, and they set the price. Secondly, you don’t get any money upfront, and you have to wait until after the item sells to get paid out. Lastly, the shop starts reducing the price of the item if it doesn’t sell after 30 days, then again after 60 days, and finally after 90 days, you can either come get your things or they are donated. Of course all of this depends on your shop’s policies. But at least I sold some things, and made a couple of bucks.

IMG_2723Poshmark- This is the most recent thing I’ve been doing and it’s going really well. Postmark is like a big yard sale app. Its actually fancier than that but we established before that I’m a little country so my mind goes right to the swap meet. Its actually pretty funny to me that I’m even on it, considering there has never been a moment in my entire life when I felt “posh.”
You make a profile and add your listings and people can buy them at price, make you an offer or bundle your items together for a discount if you chose to have that. Everything is high end brand names or designer and is in excellent condition. I do everything with my phone and after an item sells, you print out a shipping label directly from the app, and you don’t pay a thing. Postmark takes (I think) 20% of what you sell the item for (unlike Etsy that charges you to list an item and takes a portion when you sell it). I really like this platform. I have all my jewelry, shoes and a few other things up there and I’ve made around $60 just in these past few weeks.

ThredUp- I didn’t try ThredUp myself; I was all ready to until I saw some negative reviews online and then found out a friend had just sent in two huge bags stuffed with her things and stuff from her two daughters. I held off to see what her experience was. And I’m glad I did because it wasn’t good. She pretty much reiterated what the people in the reviews were saying. Processing time takes forever and they pay out pennies for the clothing they keep. Not only that but they charge $9 for the bags they send you to submit your items in, and then deduct your earnings from that. So my friend from her two huge stuffed bags was paid $2.30. …
That’s ridiculous. Its less than pennies per item. After that they ended up keeping the measly $2 because she still owed $18 for the two bags. In my opinion, not worth it. I would rather donate my items and feel like maybe I was helping someone, rather than feeling swindled by a big company that is still going to profit of of my things somehow, whether its selling them for a small profit or writing off a huge amount of donated items at the end of the year as a tax deduction.

Facebook Yard Sale Groups- I know a lot of people who have sold things on these usually closed and regional Facebook groups. Right now I have those two same pairs of shoes listed that I attempted to sell on Ebay. Fingers crossed.
The process is fairly simple, you just add a few pictures and your price and then arrange to meet the person once you have a seller. You don’t have to pay to list and Facebook doesn’t take any commission. This is good news, but there are definitely drawbacks. Dealing with strangers in person can be a little scary, especially when there’s money involved. The same friend from the ThredUp story has told me that she has had many people want to meet her at their address, and then when she suggests meeting in a common place, like the police station, they will agree and then never show up. Jeff’s uncle had attempted to sell his ATV in a group like this and was robbed! If you try to sell things in groups like this, please please please, always think of your safety over making the sale.

LetGo and Offer Up– These are both apps that are similar to Facebook groups. I had a few things listed and then ended up taking them off after I was majorly creeped out by some messages I received from a person on LetGo who initially said he was interested in my items and then proceeded to talk about “how we could meet up and talk about them since we didn’t live far.” No thanks buddy. Luckily other people can leave comments and reviews of their interactions with other users under their profiles, and another woman wrote that she had a similar experience with this same person. Final verdict: a little creepy and not worth it.

IMG_2724Decluttr- I had some pretty good success with this platform a few weeks ago. Decluttr has an app but you can also use the website, which is what I used. They buy DVD’s, CD’s, books and tech, like phones and game systems. You make your account, enter the barcode of what you’re trying to sell and they give you a price for the item. Then when you’re done you print a packing slip and a prepaid shipping label and send it in. Then a few days later, you get your pay out, either via check or PayPal.
Years ago (probably pre-kids) I mentioned to Jeff that I kind of liked a show on TV and for my birthday he bought me like six seasons of it on DVD because he couldn’t think of anything else to get me. Flash forward to now they’re still in the shrink wrap, and taking up room on the DVD shelf. I wanted to get rid of them for a while, but short of having a real yard sale at our house, I didn’t know how to do it. So there they sat.
I found Decluttr and thought it was at least worth a shot. I got a quote for those DVDs, plus a few others and a couple of books. I put them in an old Amazon box with the packing list, printed out my shipping label and dropped it off at a shipping center. About a week later I had $16 in my PayPal.  It was so easy I’m planning (hopefully this week) to make another box with some more DVD’s and the Wii that me and Jeff bought when we first moved in together in like 2008, and has been sitting in the basement since probably 2011.
The amount they offer isn’t a ton, some DVD’s were only a few cents. But I didn’t know what else to do with these, I didn’t want to put too much effort into selling them and I didn’t want them cluttering up my living room anymore, so having a couple dollars was much better than throwing them out in the garbage.

The goal in resale is obviously to make money, but know that your time, effort and safety are also valuable, not to mention the state of your living space. Always consider these when selling your items, and know when its time to let go and donate, or trash.

Amazon- It’s been a while since I sold anything on Amazon so the process and policies may be a little different now. I posted the other day on my Instagram about a baby blanket that I had bought for Abby when I was still pregnant with her. This was just the tip of the over spending iceberg I struck during that pregnancy.
I was following this woman’s blog who had been recently pregnant and would talk almost weekly about how certain products were “can’t live without must have to die for!!” and I totally fell for it. I craved that light and bright, glittery fabulous mom lifestyle she as portraying. At one point I had like four different types of bottles, a diaper sprayer, wet bag, all types of things that cost a fortune and I never was going to use. Luckily I realized this pretty soon after buying them and was able to sell them new in package on Amazon. I actually ended up selling everything that I put on there, plus some old text books from nursing school that were still relatively current.

Barnes and Noble- I thought I would mention Barnes and Noble here since it was the very first experience I had with resale when I was still in college. Instead of stashing my textbooks in the basement, I found out you could sell them back to B&N even if you didn’t buy them there. I thought I was a financial whizz at the time.
Anyways, looking at the site I see that you can still do this and I definitely recommend trying by any means for college students to make back some money they spend on astronomically priced text books.

You are allowed to make mistakes sometimes. Someone once told me something that I still have to remind myself of every day: Just because you bought it, does’t mean you have to keep it forever. Don’t be discouraged by past mistakes with money, and try to recover and grow from them. Back when I was growing up buying second hand was something poor people did and was “embarrassing.” Now its a trend. Who knew? Millennials are learning to be smarter with our money, and scoring a nice quality item at a resale price is something to be proud of, and making money back from inappropriate spending is just as awesome.

Advertisements